Bees’ knees

Made a mess, but made something pretty too.

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I did a project!

beeswax.jpg

On my way to reducing my waste to as little as possible, I have made some beeswax wraps! Unfortunately I can’t give you a great method to do this, as I have not had the best results, but I do have some pretty great advice:

  • Use baking paper. I was so close to not using any, but thank goodness I did: without it, I would have had a massive mess. As it is, the mess was only mediumish. More particulalry, use more than enough – it can be re-used, and saves a lot of time afterwards in cleaning wax off oven trays.
  • Use a pretty material. For one thing, it’s pretty. For another, it will interest other people to think of doing the same or purchasing some ready-made ones.
  • Cut some different shapes, and don’t worry about the whole inches and measuring thing – leftover food doesn’t come in uniform sizes, so food wraps don’t need to either!
  • I used a knife to cut chunks of the besswax from my hefty blocks, which was good because I didn’t damage my awesome Microplane grater, but nearly caused a significant injury way too close to my tummy-button. Be careful if you do this.
  • This website falls into my own hobby categorisation: fun, pretty, eco-friendly, cost-efficient – How To Make Your Own Reusable Food Wrap

I hope that that helps anyone out there who wants to have a go! And please, send me your advice too!

Plastic free aesthetic

I have recently made the pledge to go plastic free. Is my apartment suddenly pristine, with cute little jars with labels stacked neatly in the cupboards? Nope.

Will I ever get my apartment completely plastic free? Nope.

Have I stopped bringing things home that have single-use plastic packaging? Nope.

Look, it’s pretty hard. Milk is my stumbling block right now. I feel like I am making excuses, like “I need to use it up before I throw it out”, and “Surely this little bit won’t matter…”, and “I can’t help it f I get plastic gifts for my birthday!” The key, I think (although I am really new to this lifestyle change) is to remember “Everything in moderation. Except plastic. I hate plastic.”

So, the rules I have set up are:

  • Treat it like an adventure. Since this is my pledge, I get to do as I want with it. Instead of ringing up every supermarket in the area, I’ve decided to take trips to each one in quest of milk in glass bottles, or paper cartons. This way, I get to know my area a little better, find some interesting products hopefully, and have something to do with my non-working days that gets me outside!
  • Do use up the stuff you have. To me, going plastic free goes hand in hand with using less, buying less, making do with less, and, ultimately, throwing out less. If I use up the moisturisers, tooth brushes, shampoos, conditioners, etc. that I already have, I can repurpose them. Those bottles and things will be re-used as bottles for homemade shampoos, and what-have-you, and even toothbrushes can be reused as tiny little scrubbers, or even garden signs.
  • I have a timeline: 2019 sounds like the perfect time to be completely single-use plastic free.
  • I can not force other people to adopt the lifestyle change for me. For instance, I can’t make my housemate clean out the bin because I don’t want to use bin liners any more. Two options are: keep using the bin liners, or, I take responsibility for the bins. Yep, it’s not all pretty jars and fun hand-drawn labels in an artsy fine liner with cute pictures (I suck at drawing, and most fine liners have plastic in them anyway, so…. I guess I’ll have to suffice with plain, hand-written labels in pencil)
  • I’m doing a good deed here. If I have a few setbacks, like every time I want a milky chai at home so I buy another bottle, I feel guilty. But I need to remember that I have made progress already, and that this project is doing good. I support businesses with the same inspiring mindset, and lessen my waste as I go. I am also learning a lot about the environment and interesting alternatives, as well as how a little change makes a big difference.

I hope we can all remember this when we do anything – big or small – to improve our world. Sure, the plastic-free aesthetic is awesome and pretty and sleek and how I want my apartment to look…. off track. I may want those things, but knowing that I am helping the environment a tiny bit makes the real difference, and is the real motivation.

Projects

I am probably the exact same as everyone else – especially at this time of year.

You see, I work at Kmart. Luckily (for you), that’s not why we’re all alike. On New Year’s Day, 2017, I saw more people than usual buying work out clothes. Good on ’em. Keep it up. Good job, Bob.

At the start of the year we all get those urges to do, to experience, to be better, to be healthier, to incorporate mindfulness. I will leave the subject of mindfulness to another post, though. On that subject, I have so. Much. Advice. (In a totally non-aggressive way, of course)

I had the urge and the opportunity to re-organise my room. To tell the truth, I didn’t have the opportunity: I made it. I started at 9 pm and kept going until I had room on bed to sleep. Then I needed to get rid of things and to find new boxes for jewellery. That got me onto Pinterest and I am now making a jewellery storage space from an old corkboard that was sitting on the floor and still holding 2015’s shopping lists.

Now I am (once again) an avid Pinterest user. I have re-organised my boards and have aims to give my account a facelift. I hope that this urge will pay off: that it will help keep me active both physically and mentally, help me to learn and prepare for the day when I have to renovate my own, futuristic house, and to keep me far from boredom and well within the realm of creativity and… fun.

Good luck to all with your resolutions and aims, motivation and journeys!new-years-eve-fireworks-sydney-harbour-national-park